Tag Archives: working remote

Should You Hire a Cleaning Person When You Telecommute?

and other questions answered! When I started telecommuting a few years ago, I had a lot of questions. Over the years I have learned a lot, and I share my findings with you to help:

1. How do you deal with the telecommuters guilt, and should you feel guilty?
You got the opportunity to be a telecommuter because of your work ethics and performance. So you just continue performing as you would when you are in the office.If you don’t feel guilty working from the office whey would work from home be any different?

2. For how much and for how long should you continue to prove yourself above and beyond because you work from home?
You would need to provide yourself if you were in the office no different now. Just know that you need to have the mindset to perform and irrespective you continue doing that.

3. Where do you fit in your daily exercise?
There is the time you just need to take the initiative to find it. Here is my blog/eBook with details on how to find the time to exercise on a regular basis.

4. When you have to travel for work, how do you manage your kids’ practice schedule?
Car pool with people you trust. If you don’t trust any of the parents then get a sitter or set expectations that one of the kids will need to miss practice.

5. What do you do when your workload is slow?
When your workload is high, you compromise on personal items so when work is close catch up on your personal action items. Another option is to do training and manage administrative items that you know are going to be due in a few months like performance reviews, end-of-year calendar, etc.

6. Should you do laundry or run an errand during your lunch hour?
No laundry for sure! If the errand is short and something that will get you energized or get you out of the house and dressed then yes please go ahead.

7. How do you take breaks during your work day, and what do you do?
Yes, research shows you need to take a break every 90 mins. Taking breaks makes you more productive. Do what energizes or relax you like reading a book—a physical book. Here is my eBook with details on how to make the most of your time.

8. How do you manage your professional calendar if you are in a different time zone?
You work with their schedule but take control of your calendar. Take the initiative to schedule the meetings and ensure the timing works for your schedules. Managing your schedule gives you a choice not to schedule 7 am meetings.

9. How do you network while you work from home?
You use personal activities to build your network. The group will look different than your professional network but is a great start. Talk to parents during practice. Join meetup groups if you can find the time to attend the events or be part of the TT online community.

10. How do you manage distractions when you work from home (e.g. the door bell, a friend who needs help, etc.)?
Schedule everything and stick to it.

11. What do you do with the kids during breaks—winter, spring, or summer, since our vacation is usually shorter than theirs?
Camps, Creative projects, boredom, and free play. Take vacation when possible—this can be your time to relax and truly connect with the kids.

12. How do you manage one-off school closures?
These are hard, but with planning, you can manage them. One option is to work in the mornings and take the afternoons off to spend time with them. If they are in their tweens, create a schedule for them do finish all their work (HW, practice, etc.) while you are working. Then when you complete work, they are done, and it is time to have some fun!

13. Should you get someone to clean your house even if you work from home?
Yes! I tried to do it all for the first six months after we moved, and got sick. Treat your job the same way as you did when you were working in the office, and take breaks to do the things that refresh you.

14. Do you stay connected after hours?
No! Unless it is a critical time for my business or project, I turn off my work phone at 6 pm. Everything can wait for a few hours. Besides, I am too busy driving around to activities and don’t have the time to check the phone, and since this is my only downtime, I cherish and protect it.

15. Should you get more involved with the kids’ schools so you can meet more people?
For me, this worked a little once I found a few working mothers with flexible schedules to go for a walk once a week, or being part of my kids’ classroom by helping as needed. I did not have much luck being part of the PTA because the meetings were when I had work-related conference calls. The bet place I found to connect was after school activities and community events. These take place after work hours, so you don’t have to worry about missing meetings or to get back to work in time. When you are relaxed, you can connect.

I would like to keep the conversations and questions going, so please send your comments and ideas for making things to info@telecommuterstalk.com.

Tips for Introverted Telecommuters

One of the challenges of telecommuting is being isolated—lack of human interactions. To ensure you stay connected and have face-to-face interaction you have to be diligent about it. As an introvert, this can be very hard. Here are a few tips I use to stay connected:

Your current circle: When I moved to a new city I thought I needed to have the same level of connections and interaction as I had in the past. I continued looking in vain. Eventually, I realized the best option was to connect with the friends I already had in addition to seeking new ones. I was amazed at the satisfaction I felt even with a text or a phone conversation.

Intentional: It is hard to have small talks as an introvert so try joining a book club or volunteer to help with the school or after school activity where you are not interacting with as many people but still staying connected and adding value to the community.

Nature: As an introvert for me the best connection has been nature. I used to stay in my office all day focused on work, and I would be exhausted by the end of the day. I realized that I needed to get out either for a walk, a run or just to write. Now I take my laptop and head to the park. I enjoy the sounds of nature take a walk and work. The park is my version of a coffee shop.

Conversations: It is hard, but I find a few moms that I can connect with and who have the same priorities. I set up a walk or a lunch date. It helps me stay abreast of the activities happening in the area and talk about non-work related items. I plan these on my calendar for once every few months.

Shopping: Sometimes for an introvert to get the human interaction being around people is enough—at least for me. Once in a while I will go shopping—walk around, smile at a stranger or talk to the cashier. Just go to a store and learn. Finding new items sparks solutions for me that I need to find.

Work with your personality and preferences—do what works for you. If you have any tips, please share: info@telecommuterstalk.com

How to Manage Organizational Changes as a Telecommuter

Change always comes with opportunities. Professionally, there are many changes happening for me right now. I have the opportunity to do new work, find a new position, and create new connections. I want to take this opportunity to share with you what I am learning as part of this process.

Speak Up: Make sure that you speak up and share your thoughts on your part of the project or the overall plan as transitions are underway. It is best to provide input when you can make an impact—which is at the beginning. As a remote employee, you will need to be even more vocal than usual to make your case.

Ask Questions: Transition is a time of flux, and you need to ask clarifying and direct questions for you to understand the impact on your job. Managers are usually able to discuss some information; if they cannot discuss it, they can inform you of the same.

Stay Connected: Continue your conversations with your manager during one-on-one meetings. Lync your teammates and stay informed. Attend all the meetings that discuss the changes in your organization, since they will have an impact on you, even as a remote employee.

Update Resume: If you are looking for new opportunities, update your resume and add search agents to your company’s internal HR site. Alerts will give you access to new job openings right in your inbox. Continue talking with your mentor to work on your next steps.

Avoid Rumors: Being remote can work to your advantage, since you are not physically there to stop and listen to the conversations going on in the office. Try not to get pulled into the rumor mill. If you have questions, ask them directly to your management chain, since they will have the most accurate information.

Change is the only constant, and we need to keep going! Please share any suggestions that have worked for you at info@telecommuterstalk.com.

How to Manage Organizational Changes as a Telecommuter

Change always comes with opportunities. Professionally, I’m experiencing a lot of changes now. I have the chance to do new work, find a new position, and create new connections. I want to take this opportunity to share with you what I am learning as part of this process.

Speak Up: During transitions, make sure you speak up and share your thoughts on your part of the project or the overall plan. It’s best to provide input when you can make an impact—which is at the beginning. As a remote employee, you will need to be more vocal than usual to make your case.

Ask Questions:
A transition is a time of flux, and for you to understand its impact on your job, you need to ask clarifying and direct questions. Managers are usually able to discuss some information. Even if the information is confidential, they can inform you of that.

Stay Connected: Continue your conversations with your manager during one-on-one meetings. Stay connected with your teammates and be informed. Attend all the meetings discussing the changes in your organization, since they will have an impact on you, even as a remote employee.

Update Your Résumé: If you are looking for new opportunities, update your résumé and add search agents to your company’s internal HR site. Alerts will send you access to new job openings right to your inbox. Continue talking with your mentor to work on your next steps.

Avoid Rumors: Being remote can work to your advantage, since you are not physically there to stop and listen to the multiple conversations going on in the office. Try not to get pulled into the rumor mill. If you have questions, ask them directly to your management chain, since they would have the most accurate information.

Change is the only constant, and we need to keep going! Please share any suggestions that have worked for you: info@telecommuterstalk.com.

Six Ways to Reward Yourself as a Telecommuter this Valentine’s Day

Happy Valentine’s Day! Reward and recognition are necessary to keep most of us motivated. When you work in an office, you can see and feel more of this from your peers and your management. When you work from home, this may be reduced.

I’ve learned to create rewards that are meaningful for me when I finish an important task, project, or presentation. I do need to continue to work on this, since I finish one task and move on to the next without a break sometimes.

Here are a few suggestions that have worked for me:

  1. Lunch with a Friend:This one is always on the top of my list, because I get to connect with other adults face-to-face. By catching up with a friend, I can get updates on the community, like what to expect when school starts, which teachers are coming back, etc. I learn a lot about community happenings during these lunches.
  2. Movies:This is my favorite “alone time” activity. I enjoy going to the movies alone and immersing myself in something that makes me laugh or feel good. Going with others adds pressure to have a conversation, and sometimes you just want to keep to yourself.
  3. Window Shopping:I shop online due to convenience, but I also enjoy going to local stores. That way, I learn what the fashion trends are and what not to wear. If you work from home, dressing up is not a priority, so going out to shop helps me to keep up.
  4. Walk with a Friend:I like one-on-one conversations better than multiway interactions, so I plan to meet with a friend for a walk to talk. This may seem simple, but if you work 9-5 from home, getting out of the house for any reason is a huge accomplishment!
  5. Hiking or Rock Climbing: I go to the local community center and rock climb. It helps me stay fit and gives me great pleasure—which is a reward for me!
  6. Bath:A bath sounds so basic, but for a working mother, taking a quiet bath is huge! Taking a 20-minute bath without being called to fix something or hearing something breaking in the background is better than a trip to the Caribbean for me!

Most of the time, I plan these events in advance. Just having that anticipation encourages me to finish my task on time and keeps me excited.

Share your ideas about rewarding yourself by sending a note to info@telecommuterstalk.com.