Tag Archives: organizing

How to Manage the Chaos of Change

“Change is hard because people overestimate the value of what they have—and underestimate the value of what they may gain by giving that up.”
— James Belasco and Ralph Stayer
Flight of the Buffalo (1994)

With reorganization, there is a lot of uncertainty—here are a few ways to manage it. These tips are useful for any changes in your life:

Meditate: There is enough research on the benefits of meditation. For most working parents, the challenge is finding the time to do it. Even a five-minute meditation will have a positive impact on you. Try and find a time that works for you—any time during the day works.

Exercise: Exercise is as important as meditation. Find the time to fit some cardio, strength training, and yoga into your schedule. Here’s my article on How to Fit in Exercise While You Work Remotely.

Plan your days: Set aside the first 30 to 40 minutes of each day to plan your day. I have used this strategy for a while, but with the changes and everything being a priority at the same time, it has become even more important. I pick the top three items I need to complete on a particular day, both professionally and personally.

Take breaks: Breaks build resilience. After exercising, you need rest; the same is true with work. After some focused work, you need to take a break—even if it is only for ten minutes. As telecommuters, this is harder, but add it to your calendar and stick with it.

Sleep: Stress has a direct impact on sleep. Ensure you are getting enough rest to be productive during the day. If you are having sleep challenges try these poses to help you sleep better.

Be flexible: You need a plan to continue forward, but you also need to be flexible to accommodate the changes. Your priorities can change based on the demands of your project or management needs. Account for that in your schedule. One option is to keep your Friday afternoons open, and use that time to catch up or address any urgent request that has come up.

Ask questions: Sometimes, the deadlines imposed on you may be due to someone else’s work style instead of a true urgency. Identify team members who have a tendency to set unrealistic timelines and ask questions. Ask for a specific due date and notice due to other priorities.

What tips have worked for you? Please share at: info@telecommuterstalk.com

Setting Boundaries as a Telecommuter

In my recent articles, I’ve mentioned that my organization is going through changes, and my responsibilities have increased as part of the change. I am now working with global team members across multiple time zones. I am enjoying myself, but also have to take early morning calls with background noise!

I need to set boundaries not only personally but also professionally to ensure I have a work-life balance. Here are some ideas I have come up with to set boundaries:

Close the Office Door: When I am working, I close my door and use my “Do Not Disturb” sign that I received during the holiday season. Closing the door adds distance to household responsibilities and informs family members that I am in work mode.

Say “No” Nicely: Running to school to deliver forgotten homework or shorts will stop. I have informed my family that things need to change. This approach will keep me focused on work and teach the kids to be responsible.

Use Weekends: I would multitask during the work week, and it was exhausting. Now, I focus on a single task. When I am working, I am working—no additional chores. I use my breaks as downtime and to walk. Most household-related responsibilities are handled after work or on weekends.

Manage Your Calendar: Take charge of your calendar and the responsibility to set up meetings when possible. Taking the initiative gives you the ability to set meetings based on your schedule and time zone. Use this approach for both personal and professional meetings.

Get Help: Delegate and move on. Assign household responsibilities to your family and hire help as needed. Working from home is the same as going to work—the only difference is that you are wearing yoga pants!

If you have additional tips that work, please share at info@telecommuterstalk.com

How to Manage Organizational Changes as a Telecommuter

Change always comes with opportunities. Professionally, I’m experiencing a lot of changes now. I have the chance to do new work, find a new position, and create new connections. I want to take this opportunity to share with you what I am learning as part of this process.

Speak Up: During transitions, make sure you speak up and share your thoughts on your part of the project or the overall plan. It’s best to provide input when you can make an impact—which is at the beginning. As a remote employee, you will need to be more vocal than usual to make your case.

Ask Questions:
A transition is a time of flux, and for you to understand its impact on your job, you need to ask clarifying and direct questions. Managers are usually able to discuss some information. Even if the information is confidential, they can inform you of that.

Stay Connected: Continue your conversations with your manager during one-on-one meetings. Stay connected with your teammates and be informed. Attend all the meetings discussing the changes in your organization, since they will have an impact on you, even as a remote employee.

Update Your Résumé: If you are looking for new opportunities, update your résumé and add search agents to your company’s internal HR site. Alerts will send you access to new job openings right to your inbox. Continue talking with your mentor to work on your next steps.

Avoid Rumors: Being remote can work to your advantage, since you are not physically there to stop and listen to the multiple conversations going on in the office. Try not to get pulled into the rumor mill. If you have questions, ask them directly to your management chain, since they would have the most accurate information.

Change is the only constant, and we need to keep going! Please share any suggestions that have worked for you: info@telecommuterstalk.com.

How I Am Staying Organized This School Year As a Telecommuting Mother

At the beginning of the school year, I wrote about the challenge of keeping things organized during the school year and as promised here is an update to that article on what we are doing to keep us ahead of the clutter this year. This is where we are three months into school:

Clean monthly: We have started taking the time to organize all the papers, especially tests. All tests, assignments, and quizzes go into a folder. Each folder has a separator per subject. When it is time to study for a test, we bring out the folder and spend time studying instead of looking for the papers. Huge win!

Get the right organizing tools: I bought all the supplies I needed when we went school shopping. The advantage of buying in bulk and having everything ready before school was in full swing has helped me in the long run.

Scan and store: I have been able to file away a lot of pictures and artwork, but this will need a few more months. I did find a useful app to store memories called Keepy, and am planning on using it soon.

Schedule It: Having this on our list has also helped us—it is a reminder, and soon it will become a habit!

Reduce Paper: I address announcements papers ASAP when they get home from school and sports activities. Read it, schedule it, and trash it. Go digital when possible which is a great way to go paperless.

If you have any suggestions, please send them my way: info@telecommuterstalk.com

How to Fit in Exercise While You Work Remotely

Exercise is the first thing I give up when I get busy, even though I know that it should be the last thing I should give up when I am stressed.

Here are some tips I am trying to implement to ensure I get the exercise I need:

Put it on your calendar: I had heard this suggestion many times, so I put it on my calendar, but I just continued to pass on it. So, I started using Google Goals, which helps me take the first step and get up! Once I am up, I walk away to take a break or take a walk.

Brainstorm: See what works with your schedule and your family’s schedule. I like to exercise in the mornings, but that is also the busiest time at work, so I found another option: during the kids’ afterschool activities. This schedule has another benefit—the “mom guilt” is less, because I am not taking away my time with them. Instead, I’m doing my thing while they are doing their thing!

Fit it in: Whenever you can. Do a 7-minute workout during your break or walk while the kids are at practice. They practice, and I walk. I walk with other moms, which gives me a chance to have some human interactions. Connecting face-to-face is critical as a remoter.

Use the weekends: Weekends can be just as busy as the weekdays, but there are pockets of time when I know I can fit in some exercise or meditation. Try diligently to stick with that.

Go for a hike: Make this a family activity. It will teach the kids the value of both exercise and nature. HikeItBaby is a great resource for finding hikes in your area.

I hope these tips help you, too. If you have additional suggestions, please share.